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The CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Provides Updated Research on Emerging Infectious Diseases at Recent Conference

MAY 19, 2016 | LORRAINE L. JANECZKO, MPH
Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) may be associated with enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68), according to results by Negar Aliabadi, MD, and her colleagues, who found that EV-D68 detection in AFM cases significantly exceeded detection in controls, supporting a possible association between them.
 
Between August and October 2014, around the time of a nationwide outbreak of EV-D68 respiratory disease, doctors were puzzled to also see AFM in more children, whose cerebrospinal fluid results did not reveal a cause.
 
Colorado had the most AFM cases in the country, and the researchers studied children under 18 years of age hospitalized in the Denver area with acute focal limb weakness and gray matter spinal cord lesions of unknown cause on MRI. As controls, they used children with nasopharyngeal specimens collected during the same time period at outpatient visits for respiratory viruses (RV) or Bordetella pertussis (BP) in the same setting.
 
Overall, 10 of 11 (91%) cases had respiratory symptoms, vs 96 of 123 (80%, p=0.69) of RV controls and 263 of 274 (98%, p=0.25) of BP controls, and the cases were older than the RV controls (8 vs 5 years, median, p=0.04). EV-D68 was found in 4 of 11 (36%) AFM cases vs in 6 of 123 (5%) RV controls (p<0.01) and in 31 of 274 (11%) BP controls (p<0.01). The AFM cases had higher risk of EV-D68 detection compared with the RV controls (odds ratio 10.6, 95% CI, 1.9 to 66.7) and BP controls (odds ratio 5.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 25.7), but AFM and non-EV-D68 enterovirus were not associated.
 
Lorraine L. Janeczko, MPH, is a medical science writer who creates news, continuing medical education and feature content in a wide range of specialties for clinicians, researchers and other readers. She has completed a Master of Public Health degree through the Department of Epidemiology of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a Dana Postdoctoral Fellowship in Preventive Public Health Ophthalmology from the Wilmer Eye Institute, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School.
 
SOURCE: EIS 2016 Conference Program, pp 83-85: Concurrent Session J1: Emerging Infections
 
Studies Presented:
Morgan J. Hennessey, DVM, MPH, EIS officer, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Zika Virus in Returning U.S. Travelers — United States 2010–2014
 
Morgan J. Hennessey, DVM, MPH, EIS officer, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Acceptability of a Chikungunya Virus Vaccine — United States Virgin Islands, 2015
 
Yuri P. Springer, PhD, EIS officer, Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development , Epidemiology Workforce Branch, Alaska Resident Infected with a Novel Species of Orthopoxvirus — Alaska, 2015
 
Christopher T. Lee, MD, EIS officer, Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development , Epidemiology Workforce Branch, presented CDC Ebola Response Team Comparison of Sensitivity of a National Call Center with a Local Alerts System for Detection of New Cases of Ebola — Guinea, 2014–2015
 
Negar Aliabadi, MD, EIS officer, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Enterovirus-D68 and Acute Flaccid Myelitis Among Children: A Case-Control Study in Colorado, 2014
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