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Top 5 Contagion® News Articles for the Week of August 27, 2017


#5: FDA Approves Chagas Disease Treatment for Use in Children

Benznidazole has been granted accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in children aged 2 to 12 years with Chagas disease. It is the first treatment approved in the United States for the treatment of Chagas disease.

Incidence of Chagas disease in the United States was called into question in a Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID) published in May 2017, which presented the results of a study of Latin America-born residents of Los Angeles County, California. The authors determined an overall prevalence of Chagas infections in those individuals to be 1.24%, suggesting about 30,000 cases of the disease in Los Angeles County alone. This is in contrast to 2009 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which put the prevalence of the disease at 300,000, country-wide.

Read more about Chagas disease and the recent approval, here.

#4: Hurricane Harvey Puts Health Officials on Alert for Water-Borne Infections

Hurricane Harvey continues to move at a snail’s pace across the South-Western states, bringing with it never-ending rains that have already contributed to flooding reaching as high as the roofs of some ranch homes, as of August 28, 2017. In addition to catastrophic damage and the displacement tens of thousands of individuals from their homes, the devastating floods have the potential to cause serious infectious diseases across the regions that have been affected.

Several infections that can be caused due to flooding are listed below:

Typhoid Fever
This water-borne infection is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi. The infection is common in areas where hand-washing is less frequent, or in areas where water has been contaminated by sewage, which is common in major flood areas. Although the infection is not common in the United States, Hurricane Harvey has brought with it major flooding that increases the risk of infection.

View the rest of the list, here.

Influenza A (H3N2) has caused most of the illnesses in this severe flu season, but influenza B is becoming increasingly responsible for more infections as the flu season continues to hit the United States.