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The Contagion® Zoonotic & Vector-borne Diseases specialty page provides zoonotic & vector-borne disease-specific clinical news and articles, coverage from conferences and meetings, links to condition-specific resources, and videos and other content.


<i>Contagion</i>® to Report on ID Week 2017 in San Diego
Contagion® will be providing exclusive coverage on the conference, and so, keep your eyes peeled for session coverage and interviews with some of the key presenters.
LA County Steps Up West Nile Prevention Efforts
With new West Nile virus cases reported in California and Washington state, health officials are reminding the public that it’s not too late in the season to catch the mosquito-transmitted disease.
Top 5 <i>Contagion</i>® News Articles for the Week of September 17, 2017
In case you missed them, we've compiled the top 5 articles from this past week.
Hookworm Returns to the United States—Did It Ever Really Leave?
Despite thoughts that hookworm had been eradicated from the United States, a new study finds the parasite in Lowndes County, Alabama, begging the question—was it ever really gone?
West Nile Cases Continue to Spring Up, Despite Mosquito Season Drawing to a Close
New cases of West Nile virus springing up around the country are a reminder that the virus can continue to cause new infections well into fall, as mosquitoes continue to stay active where it’s still warm.
<i>Contagion</i>® Launches First Peer Exchange on Lyme Disease
Contagion® has unveiled its first Peer Exchange, a lively conversation between medical experts that provides opinions and perspectives on the controversy surrounding Lyme disease.
Zika Virus News Update: Three New Things You Should Know
In this update, we cover the latest news this past week associated with the Zika virus.
Dozens of Viruses Can Be Detected in Human Semen
In a new study reviewing existing literature, researchers have found that more than 2 dozen viruses have been detected in human semen.
Influenza A (H3N2) has caused most of the illnesses in this severe flu season, but influenza B is becoming increasingly responsible for more infections as the flu season continues to hit the United States.