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One Step Ahead: Investigating Salmonella in the United States

AUG 19, 2016 | CONTAGION EDITORIAL STAFF
Along-side tracking and surveillance, the CDC's Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch (ORPB) “collaborates with epidemiologists and other public health officials who investigate clusters of food-borne, waterborne, zoonotic, and other enteric (gastrointestinal) illnesses in the United States.”

The CDC’s ORPB “works to ensure rapid and coordinated surveillance, detection, and response to multistate outbreaks caused by enteric bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli infections.

Salmonella, Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC, including O157 and other serogroups), Listeria, Shigella, Vibrio, and hepatitis A virus, as well as botulism are reportable almost anywhere in the United States through the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDS). The system tracks contagious diseases that laboratory professionals and doctors report to the state or territorial public health agency. In most cases health care professionals should report food-borne illness to their governing health agency, including the CDC. For guidelines around confirming a food-borne illness, health care professionals can reference, the Guide to Confirming an Etiology in Foodborne Disease Outbreak.

For more information and data regarding tracking and reporting Salmonella contact the CDC via their website or call 800-232-4696.
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