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Top 5 Contagion® News Articles for the Week of May 14, 2017

MAY 20, 2017 | CONTAGION EDITORIAL STAFF

#1: The Increasing Public Health Burden of Atopic Dermatitis 

A recently review article highlights the epidemiology of atopic dermatitis and its increasing prevalence, and found that it may be more common in adults than previously thought.
 
Jonathan Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine discussed the increasing burden of the chronic inflammatory disease in his article. According to Dr. Silverberg, atopic dermatitis is, “associated with a considerable public health burden, owing to its very high prevalence, considerable patient-burden, and increased healthcare utilization.”
 
Data from recent studies have shown that although typically considered a childhood disease, in 2010 and 2012, prevalence rates for adults in the United States were shown to be 10.2% and 7.2%, respectively. And, one study indicated that out of 60,000 households surveyed, 54% of respondents indicated onset of disease in early adulthood.
 
Still, the disease affects mostly children, and 2007-2008 data showed that “an estimated 2.98 million children” in the United States suffered from moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Perhaps startlingly, data has shown that “the relative proportions of moderate and severe disease appear to increase with age.” Individuals who are African American/black may be more “prone to severe disease and increased healthcare utilization for the disease than whites.”
 
Although the disease is typically non-fatal, Dr. Silverberg noted that one survey found that the disease, “had the highest disability-adjusted life-years among skin disorders, which reflects both the high prevalence and patient burden.”  
 
Continue reading to learn more about the burden of disease on the patient.
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